Charting a couple's move from London to Portugal, tales, adventures and moving advice


Moving Back from Portugal – Some Early Observations 15

Posted on March 18, 2015 by Ben Algarve

Moving back to the UK after a long time in Portugal has been just as much of a shock to the system as when we did things the other way around. We’d become completely used to the Portuguese way of doing things, so it’s been a surprisingly interesting adventure.

In this post, I’m going to recount some of our initial observations and comparisons. It’s a terrible shame you can’t take the best of both countries and merge it all together somewhere in the hot sun!

Food, Glorious Food

The food in Portugal was one of the reasons we looked forward to moving there, and we still love it (enough to maintain Food and Wine Portugal!)

But….we have to be honest and say we started to get bored with a lack of variety, especially in the winter months, when we found ourselves in a bit of a rut of eating the same thing week in, week out.

Food in England - serious variety

Food in England – serious variety

Quite sensibly, Algarve restaurants often close for some of the winter or run with restricted menus, and there’s not so much of a takeaway culture. This is healthier, no doubt, but we had started to crave choice, and often found ourselves really uninspired by our options.

Well, now we have that choice. In the time since we left, food options in the UK seem to have multiplied far beyond what we remember, and all the shops seem to have all the products, all the time. Every trip to the supermarket or high street is both overwhelming and tremendously fun.

And now we DO have takeaway options: Chinese, Thai, Indian, Fish and Chips, Pizza, Kebabs – all to our door in thirty minutes. Not a habit we wish to get heavily into, but really exciting, not to mention useful when you are working, unpacking and baby-entertaining all at once.

I could go on for far longer about food, but for now England gets a big tick from us, even though we do already miss a few Portuguese dishes. However, what it really comes down to is that bacalhau aside (which would require a trip to London), there’s nothing we could get in Portugal that we couldn’t get here. There’s a LOT we can get here that we couldn’t easily get in Portugal. Oh, and all the supermarkets here deliver – very handy when you have a baby!

Booze, Glorious Booze

Now for the flip-side of the coin: beer and wine is expensive back in the UK. Really expensive.

In addition, when it comes to wine, it’s not actually that good here either. The entry cost for a bottle of wine seems to be about £6 in England now, and I’ve yet to be remotely impressed by anything at that price.

In fact, I wouldn’t be exaggerating to say that I could go into a Portuguese supermarket and choose ten reds at €3 and under that would all be better than any “budget” bottle in Britain.

Unfortunately, at £6-10 a pop, wine’s not something to waste, so my research will be slow! If the friend I spoke to last night on the subject is correct, the best option is to drink wine less frequently and splash out on pricier bottles. Either that or we will plan a trip to France soon!

Our last remaining bottle of Portuguese wine

Our last remaining bottle of Portuguese wine

On the other hand, beer and cider here is a delight, just in terms of variety, even though it’s obviously far more expensive than in Portugal. A serious craft-beer culture has sprung up in our absence too, making every (rare with a baby) trip to the pub a rather exciting experience.


I have to say I’m loving having full access to English newspapers again, complete with all the magazines and supplements at the weekend. Although I could read a Portuguese newspaper, it would take me days, and with such basic comprehension I think a lot of nuance went over my head.

Yes, you can get English newspapers in Portugal, but the choice is usually The Sun or The Daily Mail, without any supplements included. I always found it quite entertaining that the only papers available to the expat immigrants to Portugal were the right wing, anti immigration options!

Then there’s TV: In Portugal we had a full Meo package and it was….OK. However, much of the “premium” output was American trash and we never found much to watch.

Now we have a full Sky package with “catch-up” and more box sets than we could ever get through. And we have a Netflix subscription too. We’ve barely had the time to play with any of it, but I can’t imagine us finding a time when we feel there’s nothing to watch.  Best of all, it all works without fudged VPN solutions and hassle, and it’s quick, thanks to an Internet connection that’s about five times faster than we could get in Portugal.


Well, there’s no contest here is there? Portugal wins all the way, and a week spent seeing 27-degree temperatures, along with Facebook barbecue pictures from friends, resulted in our first real attack of homesickness for Portugal.

It’s not all bad, however. It may not be anything like Portugal back in South East England, but it has been dry and largely sunny since our return. A brisk walk in the sunshine to warm up and it’s actually quite pleasant out there…or so I continue to convince myself!

The sun does shine in England sometimes

The sun does shine in England sometimes

However, what I am struggling with is the reality of the fact that it could conceivably be months until we have a day that resembles summer, and that’s hard to get used to. We didn’t realise how much we’d come to take the weather for granted until we were back.


After Portugal’s solid climate victory, the UK’s lost some ground, so let’s move onto “culture.”

Here the UK is winning…big time. It’s almost as if every show and performance we’ve ever wanted to see has all been arranged for our return – or perhaps there was always this much going on and we’d just forgotten.

It seems as if every week we hear of something else we want to go to. So far we’ve got tickets to see our favourite DJ (Dimitri from Paris) play on an outdoor terrace on May bank holiday; Tickets for a one-day-only concert performance of our favourite musical (Follies) at The Royal Albert Hall, and tickets for Chic, Grace Jones and Kylie at Hyde Park in the summer!

And that’s really just the start. We’re only just beginning to see festival line-ups; remembering about Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre…the list goes on. I don’t think we ever realised how much we missed all this stuff.

So, all in all we have a rather mixed bag of first impressions, but putting the weather aside, we’re finding much to inspire us back in the UK. Now if someone could just recommend a serviceable red wine for less than six quid, our lives will be complete!

If you’d like to read more about our five years in Portugal, please check out our book.

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

Or find it here on Amazon.COM, for US readers:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

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The End of an Era 7

Posted on March 10, 2015 by Ben Algarve

It’s three months since I posted on this blog, so regular readers have perhaps been wondering what’s going on.

Well, the time has come to finally bring you up to speed.

At the beginning of the year, my wife and I came to the difficult decision to relocate back to England with our now nine-month-old son.

I guess at this point the big question is “why?” and it’s certainly one I’ve spent a lot of time answering amongst family and friends over recent weeks.

The fact is that there simply isn’t one easy answer to the question. It’s more like twenty different factors, each contributing to five-percent of the decision.

Our new beach - not in Portugal but in the UK

Our new beach – not in Portugal but in the UK

We spent some wonderful years in Portugal. Some of our time there came close to how we dreamed it would be; some things were easier than we expected; some things were far more difficult.

We learned a lot about ourselves in the process too. We learned what we need for a truly happy existence; we learned that you can be content in the cold and rain, and thoroughly miserable with the sun blazing through the window. Ironically, we also learned to build careers that allow us both to work from home, meaning that we now have more flexibility as to where we live in the UK than we did before we left!

Perhaps this is all a bit cryptic, and I guess that’s intentional, as I intend to refocus some energy on the blog in the near future and discuss all the things that contributed to our decision, as well as reporting on the ups and downs of our final months in the country.

For now, I will reassure you that our decision, although heart-wrenching in many ways, was the one that we unanimously made, and one we are extremely happy with. When we left for Portugal we were far more young and carefree; Now we’re a young family, with a different set of wants, needs and priorities. We feel the UK ticks more of our boxes for this next phase of our lives.

Meanwhile though, Portugal retains the part of our hearts it captured forever, and will surely call us back soon, if only for a holiday. Who knows what that priority list will look like in another five years?


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Christmas in Portugal: Vila Real de Santo Antonio 10

Posted on December 09, 2014 by Ben Algarve

Christmas in Portugal was rather magical for our first couple of years here, helped by the beautiful lights in our local town of Tavira. I talked about them in this post, and it’s really hard to believe I wrote it five whole years ago!

Due to the financial crisis, things have been a little flat in many Algarve towns in recent years, with slashed budgets meaning that last year Tavira only really got a tree. Still, it did better than some towns that got nothing at all.

Christmas in Vila Real de Santo Antonio

Christmas in Vila Real de Santo Antonio

We’re hoping Tavira has the “old” decorations back this year, but we’ve not had a chance to visit after dark (and given that our six month old son screams during dark car journeys, that chance won’t come easy!)

Anyway, we wanted to go somewhere where Christmas cheer was guaranteed, so we headed to the border town of Vila Real de Santo Antonio, which always makes a big effort for Christmas.

The highlight, as ever, was the huge indoor nativity scene, featuring thousands of animated figurines, complete with impressive lighting and water features. This year, there was the addition of “flying” doves over the scene too. It was as enchanting as ever and the aforementioned six-month-old seemed suitably spellbound.

Vila Real Christmas Scene

Vila Real Christmas Scene

As well as the nativity scene, there’s ice skating (on a rather small scale), a Santa’s grotto, and a small craft and food market.

All the typical Portuguese “festival foods” were present and correct: farturas (akin to donuts), smoked octopus and (most importantly for Christmas) freshly roasted chestnuts. Mulled wine was the only thing absent, but we can’t expect to find British drinks on the border of Spain and Portugal!

Portugal Christmas: Chestnuts

Portugal Christmas: Chestnuts

In case you’re not familiar with the place, Vila Real also boasts some decent kitchen and textile shops, so is a good place to grab gifts. However, it’s worth noting that everything starts to wind down quite early for Portugal (8/9PM), which is surprising when summer markets often don’t get started until after that point.

Vila Real Christmas Craft Market

Vila Real Christmas Craft Market

If you’re in the Algarve during the holiday season, I highly recommend a trip to Vila Real de Santo Antonio. It may not quite match Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland, but it’s cheaper, easier, and just as likely to spark that festive feeling.

If you’d like to read more about our five years in Portugal, please check out our book.

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

Or find it here on Amazon.COM, for US readers:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

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Christmas Gifts for Portugal Fans 5

Posted on December 01, 2014 by Ben Algarve

It’s now December, so even the “haters” now have to accept that Christmas is coming and give into festive cheer! Or at least that’s the theory!

With that in mind, today I’m going to suggest a few items that would make great Christmas presents for people who love Portugal, or perhaps even plan to move to the country like we did.

1. Piri Piri Starfish

This is our all-time favourite Portuguese recipe book, with lots of evocative writing about the country and it’s cuisine.

Piri Piri Starfish - A great Portuguese recipe book

Piri Piri Starfish – A great Portuguese recipe book

It’s also (sadly) one of only a couple of the recipe books we’ve bought over the years that’s still in print and readily available, with others now becoming rather hard to find. Grab it while you can!

It’s on Amazon UK here:

Piri Piri Starfish: Portugal Found

Readers in the US should find a copy here:

Piri Piri Starfish

2. Moving to Portugal – The Book

Yes, it’s our own book, and yes, this is a shameless plug. But if you buy if, for yourself or a friend, we get a small Christmas present in the form of a royalty payment too 😉

Moving to Portugal

Moving to Portugal

Find it here on Amazon UK:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

Or find it here on Amazon.COM, for US readers:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

3. Rosetta Stone Portuguese

If you’re really serious about learning Portuguese, then Rosetta Stone really is the “gold standard” in language-learning.

Rosetta Stone Portuguese

Rosetta Stone Portuguese

It’s worth pointing out that Rosetta Stone teaches Brazillian Portuguese, which is a little different from European Portuguse – rather like speaking American English rather than UK English, but you’ll still be understood – and certainly understood better (and respected more) than the many expats who think that speaking English loudly in Portugal is the way forward!

Rosetta Stone Portuguese is on Amazon UK here:

Rosetta Stone Portuguese (Brazil) Complete Course (PC/Mac)

And on Amazon.COM here:

Learn Portuguese: Rosetta Stone Portuguese (Brazil) – Level 1-3 Set

4. The Book of Disquiet

The Portuguese are very proud of their literary heritage, and there’s no better place to start than with this translation of Fernando Pessoa’s “Book of Disquiet.”

Fernando Pessoa - The Book of Disquiet

Fernando Pessoa – The Book of Disquiet

It’s not the easiest of reads, but an essential for anyone who wishes to immerse themselves in Portuguese history and culture.

It’s on Amazon UK here:

The Book of Disquiet (Serpent’s Tail Classics)

US Readers will find it here:

The Book of Disquiet (Penguin Classics)

5. The Rough Guide to Portugal

We have a shelf full of Portugal guide books for the use of us and our guests, but if we could only have one, it would have to be the Rough Guide.

Rough Guide to Portugal

Rough Guide to Portugal

Some of our other guidebooks are better in terms of photos, but often gloss over places that are worthy of explanation. So if you’re setting off to really explore Portugal (and you really should!) this is the book you need.

Find it on Amazon UK here:

The Rough Guide to Portugal

Or on Amazon US here:

The Rough Guide to Portugal

We hope this list helps you with a few ideas for you and your Portugal-loving friends! Seasons Greetings!

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Life in Portugal: An Algarve Mini Break 2

Posted on November 05, 2014 by Ben Algarve

There are plenty of great things about living in Portugal, but we particularly love the ability to enjoy everything the Algarve has to offer in the off-season period. 

There’s nowhere in the whole region that’s much more than an hour’s drive away, which allows us to enjoy last minute breaks when the weather is fine and the prices are cheap. It’s genuinely possible to stay for around €40 per night in resorts that people will have been paying €250+ for just a couple of months ago. 

That’s exactly what we did last weekend, as we noticed from the long term forecast that we probably had our last chance to enjoy some hot sunshine before Autumn truly set in. Although it’s still warm during the day, it’s getting decidedly chilly once the sun goes down, and the clock change a couple of weeks ago has certainly made the days feel far shorter.

Our very own cove in Portugal

Our very own cove in Portugal

We set off after work on Friday for a cliff-top resort near Carvoeiro. We were undecided on where to go until we realised that the one thing we hadn’t done this summer is spend much time on the beach. The resort in question had direct access to a gorgeous little cove, so seemed perfect.

As it turned out, we spent very little time on the beach itself. The path down to it was very steep and rocky, making the journey rather arduous with a five-month old and a buggy. The water was also rather rough. However, it was no problem to us, as we spent all of Saturday relaxing in the hotel grounds, reading and enjoying the view.

A fine Algarve view to wake up to

A fine Algarve view to wake up to

Unfortunately, after a sunny start on Sunday, the clouds descended. All three of us (baby included) were feeling so relaxed that we were in danger of napping the day away, so we decided to drive to Portimão to visit the Algarve’s only Primark store (sad, I know!)

This perhaps wasn’t the best decision. Although we managed to bag several bargains (including our son’s first Christmas outfit), it did occur to us on our return to the resort that we’d wasted one of two “holiday days” at a shopping centre!

So, after a fine dinner of arroz de pato (duck rice) and salad in our accommodation, Monday came around, all too quickly, and it was time to head home and get on with our work. On the way, however, we did fit in a trip to our favourite burger joint in Almancil for a delicious lunch.

Burgers on the way home

Burgers on the way home

Although our mini break was over in the blink of an eye, it ticked the relaxation box and gave our motivation a much needed boost. We enjoyed loads of precious family time, took some great photos, and made some memories. Best of all, we didn’t need to feel too sad about it coming to an end, as living in Portugal means we can do it all again some other weekend without breaking the bank. It’s all good.

Interested in living in Portugal? Check out out book! Moving to Portugal

Readers in the USA will find it here.

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Only in Portugal! 3

Posted on October 27, 2014 by Ben Algarve

Boring techie stuff ahead – be warned!

As I mentioned last week, we’ve just finished moving into our new home in Portugal—or at least we thought we had.

It turns out that the finishing touches are still not quite…finished.

Our biggest challenge at the moment is all the technology, which is quite embarrassing when one of my working hats is that of an IT consultant.

Our house is modern, and beautifully built with a really good finish. Where the builder did go wrong is in deciding how many mains outlets to scatter around. The living / dining room sports just four sockets, one in each corner.

I want one of these

I want one of these

In a world where most people have at least a router, TV, DVD player and TV box, this is insanity. Yes, you can buy adaptors. I know this because we now have loads of them. At last count, we have seven items to plug in on our TV corner, several of which have big clunky plugs that cover up the neighbouring socket.

We’ve finally, thanks to a rather expensive product called PowerCube, been able to plug everything in without having to crawl behind the unit daily. You can take a look at it below – it’s really simple, yet really clever.

allocacoc 240V 4 Way Power Strip PowerCube Duo USB Extended

However, while we’re on the subject of “first world problems,” we’ve also had a problem with our Meo TV package (the Portuguese equivalent to Comcast in the US, or Sky in the UK).

I should have been in IT consultant mode when the engineer came to install it instead of naïve consumer mode, because it was a real bodge job. Like many modern Portuguese homes, we have some data cabling in the walls, but the same builder who was inexplicably stingy with mains plugs only gave us one data port by the TV, which wasn’t sufficient to run the cable up to the bedroom for the second Meo box.

MEO - Portuguese TV and Internet

MEO – Portuguese TV and Internet

What the engineer did was either highly ingenious or really daft, I’ve not quite decided yet. Essentially he used just one split cable both to feed in the ADSL connection, AND send a network connection upstairs in the opposite direction. I think I’ll go for “daft” on the basis that it worked for just a few days. I should have guessed when he was so keen to get out the door on installation day.

Rather than call them back, I decided to do my own thing. We had already (in a separate problem) discovered that our Wi-Fi gets nowhere near the top floor, which, in a cruel twist of fate, is where we’d decided to put our office room. So, I had that problem to sort out too.

I decided to use a clever “home plug” system from Devolo, which feeds the home network over the household wiring, and adds extra wireless access points. Details here:

Devolo dLAN 500 Wi-Fi Starter Kit

I have to say I was very impressed with these units, especially as their equivalents were worse than crap when I used to do IT work full time some years ago. There was just one problem though: they either die or slow down to a crawl as soon as they’re plugged into a multi-plug adaptor. As you will know if you’ve been paying attention, we HAVE to use those, as the builders of this lovely modern property decided one plug is plenty for the corner of a living room. (Although, as if to tease us, they fitted FOUR in the tiny upstairs cloakroom for some unknown reason).

So, as things stand, we still can’t use all of our electronic devices all over the house without lots of plugging and unplugging. We now have, at last count, six spare multi-plug adaptors, and miraculously STILL need to buy another one next time we go to the shopping centre.

The Powercube

The Powercube

I WILL prevail with this eventually – but until then, please don’t ask why our Wi-Fi doesn’t work on the top floor (especially when I “work in IT”), or why I’m crawling around behind the TV again. Anyone doing so may experience a painful encounter with a four-gang socket 😉

I should point out that the products I’ve mentioned above are both REALLY good, and come highly recommended!

IMAGE CREDIT: Wikimedia Commons

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Living in Portugal: Our New Home 1

Posted on October 20, 2014 by Ben Algarve

(Ben) Just as we approach our five-year anniversary of living in Portugal, we have finally completed the move to our new home.

This weekend was hard work, and not helped by the fact that summer has decided to return to the Algarve.

Living in Portugal - Autumn Weather

Living in Portugal – Autumn Weather

Please don’t get me wrong, because I’m certainly not complaining about the weather shown in the image above! However, it certainly made moving the last five carloads of possessions an arduous and sweaty process, especially as most of the things left were those things you neither use nor want to throw away, so most of them had to be carried to the storage cupboards on the top floor of our house.

Our fast-growing “baby” boy wasn’t massively impressed with us. He didn’t find moving house very fun, even though he’s been given the biggest room in the new property all to himself! So now we’re done, it’s time to give him lots of cuddles and attention, something he’s unlikely to be short of this week when my mother and family arrive to meet him for the first time.

I have to confess that I’ve dragged a couple of this week’s tasks forward to next week. I’ve not seen my family for ages, and it seems very fortunate that their arrival coincides with such a beautiful week of weather. So I’ve decided to slack off a bit. I may not get sick pay, holiday pay, or any of the job security that comes with being an employed person, but every now and then being freelance is bloody great – just like living in Portugal :-)

Living in Portugal in the Sunshine

Living in Portugal in the Sunshine

Would you like weather like this in October? Check out out book! Moving to Portugal

Readers in the USA will find it here.

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Portugal versus Spain 0

Posted on October 17, 2014 by Ben Algarve

(Lou) In my professional capacity I often come across couples who, like Ben and I, have decided that life is not limited to the UK simply because that was where they happened to be born. I’m often curious to hear about their experiences of buying homes overseas and, when I recently came across two couples, one of which had bought in Portugal and the other in Spain, I was eager to compare and contrast their experiences.

Moira and Colin Hutchinson opted for Portugal, buying a delightful apartment on a modern development in the pretty fishing village of Cabanas in the eastern Algarve through Ideal Homes Portugal. Their move out here will take place once Colin retires and at present they are splitting their time between the UK and Portugal.

Moira Hutchinson Photo at O Pomar LRThe Hutchinsons came across Ideal Homes Portugal through a TV advert – an advert that was to have a greater impact on their lives than either of them could have predicted. They flew out on an inspection trip and found the holiday/retirement apartment of their dreams. They arranged to furnish it over the internet, then shipped out their possessions through Algarve Removals.

Their key piece of advice to those looking to move to Portugal is to organise the furniture for their new home before moving to it, as it can be a lengthy process, something which Ben and I discovered recently when we were told the dining table we wanted to buy would take at least a month to deliver. Knowing that a Portuguese ‘five minutes’ can be anything up to two hours, goodness only knows how long a month’s delivery might take!

Moria and Colin are delighted with their apartment and are already enjoying spending an increasing amount of time in Portugal, prior to moving out here fulltime when Colin retires. The culture, cuisine and weather top their list of reasons for loving Portugal.

DSCN0100 LRMeanwhile, across the border in Spain, Mike and Val Reay cite the weather, wine and food as the key drivers behind their choice of country, as well as the stunning scenery to be found when one veers from the beaten track. Like the Hutchinsons, they opted for a new build, high spec development, buying through Taylor Wimpey España. Again like the Hutchinsons, a sea view was important, along with plentiful outside space.

Having read so many horror stories about Brits buying in Spain, they were relieved to find that the buying process was actually very clear and straightforward. They now split their time between the UK and Calpe in Spain, spending two months alternately in each.

The key piece of advice to come out of the Reays’ experience was the use of a bilingual lawyer. Having someone who spoke both Spanish and English fluently and was able to explain legal terms to them was a very reassuring part of the whole process. (Ben and I have definitely found this to be the case here in Portugal, where our fabulous lawyer is able to explain the finer points of Portuguese law to us in flawless English.)

Mike and Val ReayBoth the Hutchinsons and the Reays found their overseas property purchase to be easier than they might have anticipated. They have quick access from the UK to their second homes and are able to enjoy the glorious weather, welcoming atmosphere and distinctive cuisine of their country of choice whenever they wish.

As to who chose the better country (Spain or Portugal), it will come as no surprise to readers that Portugal gets my vote. While I love spending time in Spain and Ben and I cross the border frequently to stock up on Spanish foodie treats and explore western Spain, there’s always a big smile on my face at the end of the day when we cross the river and head back into Portugal.

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Moving House in Portugal 4

Posted on October 06, 2014 by Ben Algarve

It’s a well-known theory that moving house is “one of the most stressful things you can do.”

I’m not convinced I buy into the theory, as I can think of plenty of other far more stressful things, but it’s certainly tiring, time-consuming and arduous. It’s what we’ve been doing for the past week and half, and the reason this blog has gone rather quiet lately.

Algarve sunset from our new home

Algarve sunset from our new home

We’ve not completed the move yet. I’d say we’re perhaps 70% of the way there, but thankfully we still have plenty of “cross over period” left, so we don’t have to rush too much with the final bits.

A simple post about the move would be rather dull, so I’ve decided to do a list post, talking about the good and bad bits of the move so far, which should paint an overall picture of how we’ve been getting on.

The Good Bits

  1. Taking in our beautiful new sea view from the roof terrace. I’ll be surprised if I ever get bored with this or take it for granted. One surprise has been the fact that it never occurred to us that the night view would be just as wonderful, when all the lights of the town twinkle below, and we can make out each of the departing fishing boats as night begins to fall.
  1. Buying lots of new things for our home, from electrical goods, via shelf units and bins, to treats for our infant son, including the pictured “jumperoo,” which is a great success, even though it’s twice as big as it looked on the box picture and could do with a room of its own!
New kids toys in the new house

New kids toys in the new house

  1. Feeling surprisingly fit and healthy, as a result of every single day being a non-stop mission of climbing stairs and lifting boxes—who needs the gym?!
  1. Cooking and eating our first meals in our new home, and enjoying the extra kitchen space—even though muscle memory is causing me to reach for everything in the wrong place and bumble about clumsily.
  1. Enjoying having south facing outside space, so that we can appreciate the evening sun. We did have a south facing terrace on our old apartment, but the one place where there was room for a lounger was directly below where the swallows nest each year, making sunbathing a treacherous and dirty experience…

The Bad Bits

  1. Breaking a few treasured items in the process of moving, including some serving dishes, and a much-loved steel saucepan that bit the dust in an “unfortunate” mini-inferno while I was foolishly trying to multi-task.
  1. Taking my holidaying father-in-law to hospital in Faro in the dead of night due to a stomach issue. (This is a “good bit” too, as he’s absolutely fine now, and was impressed with the care he received).
  1. Worrying that me treating said father-in-law to too much rich food and wine may have been the cause of the above!
Our first meal in our new house in Portugal

Our first meal in our new house in Portugal

  1. Being really proactive in changing all of our addresses only to find that we’d been given the incorrect postcode for our new home, requiring us to start all over again. This has resulted in a stern ticking off from one accountant, and silence ever since from another, who’s clearly unimpressed about having to do the work twice. It wasn’t my fault!
  1. Buying a five-gang socket to place behind the TV unit, then buying a six-gang socket as I realised I was one short, then realising today that the Internet people would need another one for the router. On the bright side, at least we will now have plenty of adaptors for Christmas lights later in the year.
  1. Realising, while I write this, that there’s still absolutely tons of stuff to move.
  1. Feeling sad watching all of the homeliness gradually being stripped away from our old apartment, where we’ve been very content for nearly five years. I feel oddly disloyal when I pop back there to grab something else. I’m a sentimental soul.

So there you have it. Our new house is gradually taking shape, and I hope that a week from now, we’ll feel like we’ve at least nearly finished. “Visitor season” is now upon us; after my father in law leaves on Wednesday we have six more people visiting between now and the beginning of November. Even with a nearly new baby, I wonder if we’ll wonder what we did with our time once all this calms down!

If you’re considering a move to Portugal, please check out our book!

UK Readers will find the book here:

Moving to Portugal

US Readers will find the book here:

Moving to Portugal

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East Algarve Paradise – Fábrica 3

Posted on September 15, 2014 by Ben Algarve

When you’ve lived in the same location for several years, it’s easy to get stuck in a rut and continue to visit the same places.

Often this is because you’ve found places you love, such as bars, restaurants and beaches, and see no real point in branching out. However, from time to time it’s refreshing to try to view your area with fresh eyes, and attack exploring it with the same zeal as when you first moved there.

Fabrica - Algarve Paradise

Fabrica – Algarve Paradise

With this in mind, when I decided to go for a quick Sunday moped ride, I opted against my usual cruise across the saltpans and around Tavira, and instead headed East along the Algarve Ecovia route, in the direction of the tiny coastal hamlet of Fábrica.

I’d been to Fábrica plenty of times before. In fact, the picture below was once a contender as the cover for our book.

Fabrica - Nearly the Moving to Portugal book cover!

Fabrica – Nearly the Moving to Portugal book cover!

However, this time around the tide was lower than I had ever seen it, and as I sat and had a drink, I noticed that people were able to make it on foot all the way out to the main beach and ocean, across the Ria Formosa.

It was clear that there would be some wading involved but I couldn’t resist. I hitched up my shorts and set off.

Within a short ten minutes I had found a route through the low water and arrived at the rear of the beach, which is technically the far eastern end of Cabanas Island. At high tide, this is a mere strip of sand (accessible by boat only), but I arrived at a vast paradise, populated by just a few people and some kite-surfers.

Fabrica - East Algarve - Portugal

Fabrica – East Algarve – Portugal

With the best will in the world, you do start to take for granted the beauty of where you live, but this was a real “wow” moment. I lingered and took a quick video clip that you’ll find on the Moving to Portugal Facebook page.

As I headed back, the previously warm shallow pools seemed considerably deeper than before, making a trip across this seascape perhaps a little foolhardy without watching the tides carefully to avoid becoming stranded. But that’s exactly what I intend to do over the coming years, as I can think of no better seaside paradise for my new son to play in once he begins to run around.

Wading across to Fabrica Beach

Wading across to Fabrica Beach

As I neared the shore once more, I noticed a couple staring intently at the sand before them. Unsure of what they were looking at, I paused a moment, and in all directions noticed an array of tiny scuttling crabs in all kinds of outlandish colours. Any human approach resulted in them disappearing down the hundreds of small holes in the sand, which I’d also failed to notice.

And that seems a fitting way to end this post. Just as familiarity with an area can stop you noticing its charms, failing to slow down, look and think can stop you noticing what is (and was in this case) right before your eyes. It’s time to redouble my efforts to explore this extraordinarily beautiful part of the world.

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