Charting a couple's move from London to Portugal, tales, adventures and moving advice

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Archive for the ‘happy holidays’


Christmas in Portugal: Vila Real de Santo Antonio 6

Posted on December 09, 2014 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

Christmas in Portugal was rather magical for our first couple of years here, helped by the beautiful lights in our local town of Tavira. I talked about them in this post, and it’s really hard to believe I wrote it five whole years ago!

Due to the financial crisis, things have been a little flat in many Algarve towns in recent years, with slashed budgets meaning that last year Tavira only really got a tree. Still, it did better than some towns that got nothing at all.

Christmas in Vila Real de Santo Antonio

Christmas in Vila Real de Santo Antonio

We’re hoping Tavira has the “old” decorations back this year, but we’ve not had a chance to visit after dark (and given that our six month old son screams during dark car journeys, that chance won’t come easy!)

Anyway, we wanted to go somewhere where Christmas cheer was guaranteed, so we headed to the border town of Vila Real de Santo Antonio, which always makes a big effort for Christmas.

The highlight, as ever, was the huge indoor nativity scene, featuring thousands of animated figurines, complete with impressive lighting and water features. This year, there was the addition of “flying” doves over the scene too. It was as enchanting as ever and the aforementioned six-month-old seemed suitably spellbound.

Vila Real Christmas Scene

Vila Real Christmas Scene

As well as the nativity scene, there’s ice skating (on a rather small scale), a Santa’s grotto, and a small craft and food market.

All the typical Portuguese “festival foods” were present and correct: farturas (akin to donuts), smoked octopus and (most importantly for Christmas) freshly roasted chestnuts. Mulled wine was the only thing absent, but we can’t expect to find British drinks on the border of Spain and Portugal!

Portugal Christmas: Chestnuts

Portugal Christmas: Chestnuts

In case you’re not familiar with the place, Vila Real also boasts some decent kitchen and textile shops, so is a good place to grab gifts. However, it’s worth noting that everything starts to wind down quite early for Portugal (8/9PM), which is surprising when summer markets often don’t get started until after that point.

Vila Real Christmas Craft Market

Vila Real Christmas Craft Market

If you’re in the Algarve during the holiday season, I highly recommend a trip to Vila Real de Santo Antonio. It may not quite match Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland, but it’s cheaper, easier, and just as likely to spark that festive feeling.

If you’d like to read more about our five years in Portugal, please check out our book.

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

Or find it here on Amazon.COM, for US readers:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

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Christmas Gifts for Portugal Fans 5

Posted on December 01, 2014 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

It’s now December, so even the “haters” now have to accept that Christmas is coming and give into festive cheer! Or at least that’s the theory!

With that in mind, today I’m going to suggest a few items that would make great Christmas presents for people who love Portugal, or perhaps even plan to move to the country like we did.

1. Piri Piri Starfish

This is our all-time favourite Portuguese recipe book, with lots of evocative writing about the country and it’s cuisine.

Piri Piri Starfish - A great Portuguese recipe book

Piri Piri Starfish – A great Portuguese recipe book

It’s also (sadly) one of only a couple of the recipe books we’ve bought over the years that’s still in print and readily available, with others now becoming rather hard to find. Grab it while you can!

It’s on Amazon UK here:

Piri Piri Starfish: Portugal Found

Readers in the US should find a copy here:

Piri Piri Starfish

2. Moving to Portugal – The Book

Yes, it’s our own book, and yes, this is a shameless plug. But if you buy if, for yourself or a friend, we get a small Christmas present in the form of a royalty payment too ;-)

Moving to Portugal

Moving to Portugal

Find it here on Amazon UK:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

Or find it here on Amazon.COM, for US readers:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

3. Rosetta Stone Portuguese

If you’re really serious about learning Portuguese, then Rosetta Stone really is the “gold standard” in language-learning.

Rosetta Stone Portuguese

Rosetta Stone Portuguese

It’s worth pointing out that Rosetta Stone teaches Brazillian Portuguese, which is a little different from European Portuguse – rather like speaking American English rather than UK English, but you’ll still be understood – and certainly understood better (and respected more) than the many expats who think that speaking English loudly in Portugal is the way forward!

Rosetta Stone Portuguese is on Amazon UK here:

Rosetta Stone Portuguese (Brazil) Complete Course (PC/Mac)

And on Amazon.COM here:

Learn Portuguese: Rosetta Stone Portuguese (Brazil) – Level 1-3 Set

4. The Book of Disquiet

The Portuguese are very proud of their literary heritage, and there’s no better place to start than with this translation of Fernando Pessoa’s “Book of Disquiet.”

Fernando Pessoa - The Book of Disquiet

Fernando Pessoa – The Book of Disquiet

It’s not the easiest of reads, but an essential for anyone who wishes to immerse themselves in Portuguese history and culture.

It’s on Amazon UK here:

The Book of Disquiet (Serpent’s Tail Classics)

US Readers will find it here:

The Book of Disquiet (Penguin Classics)

5. The Rough Guide to Portugal

We have a shelf full of Portugal guide books for the use of us and our guests, but if we could only have one, it would have to be the Rough Guide.

Rough Guide to Portugal

Rough Guide to Portugal

Some of our other guidebooks are better in terms of photos, but often gloss over places that are worthy of explanation. So if you’re setting off to really explore Portugal (and you really should!) this is the book you need.

Find it on Amazon UK here:

The Rough Guide to Portugal

Or on Amazon US here:

The Rough Guide to Portugal

We hope this list helps you with a few ideas for you and your Portugal-loving friends! Seasons Greetings!

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Life in Portugal: An Algarve Mini Break 2

Posted on November 05, 2014 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

There are plenty of great things about living in Portugal, but we particularly love the ability to enjoy everything the Algarve has to offer in the off-season period. 

There’s nowhere in the whole region that’s much more than an hour’s drive away, which allows us to enjoy last minute breaks when the weather is fine and the prices are cheap. It’s genuinely possible to stay for around €40 per night in resorts that people will have been paying €250+ for just a couple of months ago. 

That’s exactly what we did last weekend, as we noticed from the long term forecast that we probably had our last chance to enjoy some hot sunshine before Autumn truly set in. Although it’s still warm during the day, it’s getting decidedly chilly once the sun goes down, and the clock change a couple of weeks ago has certainly made the days feel far shorter.

Our very own cove in Portugal

Our very own cove in Portugal

We set off after work on Friday for a cliff-top resort near Carvoeiro. We were undecided on where to go until we realised that the one thing we hadn’t done this summer is spend much time on the beach. The resort in question had direct access to a gorgeous little cove, so seemed perfect.

As it turned out, we spent very little time on the beach itself. The path down to it was very steep and rocky, making the journey rather arduous with a five-month old and a buggy. The water was also rather rough. However, it was no problem to us, as we spent all of Saturday relaxing in the hotel grounds, reading and enjoying the view.

A fine Algarve view to wake up to

A fine Algarve view to wake up to

Unfortunately, after a sunny start on Sunday, the clouds descended. All three of us (baby included) were feeling so relaxed that we were in danger of napping the day away, so we decided to drive to Portimão to visit the Algarve’s only Primark store (sad, I know!)

This perhaps wasn’t the best decision. Although we managed to bag several bargains (including our son’s first Christmas outfit), it did occur to us on our return to the resort that we’d wasted one of two “holiday days” at a shopping centre!

So, after a fine dinner of arroz de pato (duck rice) and salad in our accommodation, Monday came around, all too quickly, and it was time to head home and get on with our work. On the way, however, we did fit in a trip to our favourite burger joint in Almancil for a delicious lunch.

Burgers on the way home

Burgers on the way home

Although our mini break was over in the blink of an eye, it ticked the relaxation box and gave our motivation a much needed boost. We enjoyed loads of precious family time, took some great photos, and made some memories. Best of all, we didn’t need to feel too sad about it coming to an end, as living in Portugal means we can do it all again some other weekend without breaking the bank. It’s all good.

Interested in living in Portugal? Check out out book! Moving to Portugal

Readers in the USA will find it here.

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Living in Portugal: Our New Home 1

Posted on October 20, 2014 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

(Ben) Just as we approach our five-year anniversary of living in Portugal, we have finally completed the move to our new home.

This weekend was hard work, and not helped by the fact that summer has decided to return to the Algarve.

Living in Portugal - Autumn Weather

Living in Portugal – Autumn Weather

Please don’t get me wrong, because I’m certainly not complaining about the weather shown in the image above! However, it certainly made moving the last five carloads of possessions an arduous and sweaty process, especially as most of the things left were those things you neither use nor want to throw away, so most of them had to be carried to the storage cupboards on the top floor of our house.

Our fast-growing “baby” boy wasn’t massively impressed with us. He didn’t find moving house very fun, even though he’s been given the biggest room in the new property all to himself! So now we’re done, it’s time to give him lots of cuddles and attention, something he’s unlikely to be short of this week when my mother and family arrive to meet him for the first time.

I have to confess that I’ve dragged a couple of this week’s tasks forward to next week. I’ve not seen my family for ages, and it seems very fortunate that their arrival coincides with such a beautiful week of weather. So I’ve decided to slack off a bit. I may not get sick pay, holiday pay, or any of the job security that comes with being an employed person, but every now and then being freelance is bloody great – just like living in Portugal :-)

Living in Portugal in the Sunshine

Living in Portugal in the Sunshine

Would you like weather like this in October? Check out out book! Moving to Portugal

Readers in the USA will find it here.

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Escaping to Lisbon 7

Posted on August 26, 2014 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

(Ben) The Algarve is always mobbed with tourists at this point in the summer, and it’s fair to say that we usually reach a point where we’ve had enough of the invasion.

This year, we were at breaking point by the start of August, and felt the urge to get away. I was given the opportunity to do a bit of work in Lisbon, and we figured that as most of Lisbon’s population seemed to be in our little town, it would make sense to swap with them, and spend a little time in the city.

Lisbon Centre

Lisbon Centre

I headed up on the train by myself last Wednesday, with wife and baby following the next day by car. The train journey was a great experience (and good value too), but I’ll write about that in more detail in a future post.

As I had most of the first day to myself, I headed onto the metro system and took a wander around downtown Lisbon. I started off at Lisbon’s main food market, the Mercado da Ribeira, and was delighted to find that half of it has been turned into a huge “tapas hall” run by Time Out. I enjoyed various fishy tapas, which fuelled me for the long, hot walk up through the Baixa and Rossio districts.

Time Out Lisbon - Sardine Escabeche Roll

Time Out Lisbon – Fish Escabeche Roll

Once my wife arrived, we went and had dinner in the hotel restaurant, which I’ve reviewed on my Food and Wine Portugal blog here.

The following day, I went to check out the twice-weekly flea market, known as the Feira da Ladra. This was a truly fascinating experience, with stalls selling everything from tourist tat to complete tat, via genuine collectables and antiques.

Some of the “stalls” were no more than sheets on the ground covered with random items – I saw everything from single shoes(?) to old computer motherboards and 60s porn magazines. Much of what I saw wasn’t even fit for landfill, and I’m sure many stallholders sell nothing at all, but I have no doubt that people with the right eye could find real treasures amongst the millions of items on offer. Below are a few photos to give you an idea of what the market has to offer.

Lisbon Flea Market

Lisbon Flea Market

Lisbon Market - Random Items

Lisbon Market – Random Items

Lisbon Feira da Ladra

Lisbon Feira da Ladra – Dog not for sale..

Feira da Ladra Lisboa

Feira da Ladra Lisboa

After a quick lunch, and an exhausting uphill walk that got me nowhere near the castle (thanks for that Apple Maps), I returned to the hotel via some kind of inner city ghetto zone (thanks again, Apple Maps), where our three-month old son had truly made the room his own. If you’re interested, I’ve written an article about holidaying with a new baby on my new Nervous New Dad blog here.

We dedicated the rest of our stay to exploring a couple of places on the outskirts of Lisbon, with a view to a potential move up there at some point in the future. We tend to blow hot and cold about staying in the Algarve, and sometimes feel the urge to move closer to the city. For now, however, we’re just interested in getting a feel for some of the places we could live.

The first place we explored was the surfing mecca of Ericeira, around 40 minutes drive from central Lisbon. Although the place was absolutely stunning (see photo), it wasn’t for us. It seemed rather too self-consciously quirky, and parking was horrific. For us, it was like getting Brighton’s “The Lanes” district, without getting all the other good stuff in Brighton. It was a fine day out, but neither of us got that “we could live here” feeling.

Ericeira Near Lisbon

Ericeira Near Lisbon

We felt very differently about Alcochete, a small town facing Lisbon over the Tejo estuary. The town had a great feel, and the journey to Lisbon was both simple and beautiful, over the iconic Vasco de Gama bridge. The town also had a river beach with warm (but sadly rather dirty looking) water. There were people swimming there, but I’m not sure it was the best idea—there was certainly no blue flag to be seen.

For now, we’re happy enough where we are, but if we do decide to head closer to the city one day, Alcochete is certainly on our short list.

Alchochete Near Lisbon

Alcochete Near Lisbon

So, now we’re back in the Algarve with only a few weeks until the place quietens down. Until then, we will keep our heads down and get on with our work, and wait patiently to get our little town back!

As mentioned earlier, you can read more about our first breaks with the new baby over at my Nervous New Dad blog.

If you want to read more about moving to Portugal, check out our book here:

Moving to Portugal

Readers in the US can use this link to find the book:

Moving to Portugal: How a young couple started a new life in the sun – and how you could do the same

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An Algarve Summer in Pictures – Part 1 4

Posted on October 29, 2013 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

(Ben) This summer, my brother in law has spent a few months in the Algarve. He’s recently caught the photography bug, and has been turning out plenty of beautiful pictures that put our washed-out iPhone efforts to shame.

He’s also kindly agreed to let me share a selection of the photographs here. So today, I’m pleased to present an Algarve summer in photographic form. There will be more to come in a subsequent post.

Cabanas Beach, East Algarve

Cabanas Beach, East Algarve

Oranges in the orchard

Oranges in the orchard

A Tavira Terrapin

A Tavira Terrapin

The wild West coast

The Wild West coast

Alcoutim river beach

Alcoutim river beach

Castro Marim medieval fair

Castro Marim medieval fair

Octopus jerky at Castro Marim Medieval Fair

Octopus jerky at Castro Marim Medieval Fair

Praia da Luz in the peak of summer

Praia da Luz in the peak of summer

Fiesa Sand Sculptures

Fiesa Sand Sculptures

Strange red bug

Strange red bug

Canon at Sagres

Canon at Sagres

Castro Marim Castle

Castro Marim Castle

All images (C) Robert Herring 2013. All rights reserved.

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Cruising to Madeira 4

Posted on October 15, 2013 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

(Ben) Every time I post on this blog nowadays I seem to begin with an apology for the length of time between my updates. I guess it’s no bad thing that I’ve got plenty of work to do, with employment being so hard to come by here in Portugal, but I do wish I had a little more blogging time.

Still, while the work keeps coming, I have to keep doing it, so I’m glad I have at least found a quick gap in which to type up this quick update.

Hitting the high seas

Hitting the high seas

I guess it’s technically autumn now here in the Algarve, but you wouldn’t know it with temperatures still frequently in the high 20s. Even so, the evenings are getting a little cooler, and though I’m stubbornly remaining in shorts and flip-flops, my wife is now in jeans by sundown most days!

The tourists seem happy with the weather, and there are still plenty of them around, but we’ve had to accept the end of summer and get back to the grindstone.

However, we have booked ourselves a little holiday! Next month we head off on a cruise to Morocco, Madeira and the Canary Islands. A cruise is something we’ve always wanted to try, even though many of our friends have appeared baffled by our desire to do so!

This time we will see Madeira from the opposite direction

This time we will see Madeira from the opposite direction

We’ve looked into cruising before, but the thing that’s put us off has been that the majority of routes start in Barcelona, which for us involves a drive to Seville, followed by a flight, before we even get to board our ship.

Last week, I discovered a very inexpensive cruise beginning in Malaga, which is much easier as we can get there in the car in around four hours, the last hour of which is through stunning mountain scenery.

So we set off next month and will be calling at Barcelona, Casablanca, Madeira and Lanzarote. Ironically, it’s revisiting the Portuguese island of Madeira that we’re most excited about, but setting foot in Africa for the first time is also rather thrilling.

Somewhere to revisit in Madeira

Somewhere to revisit in Madeira

We’ve clearly taken quite a gamble with a November cruise. The weather will be hit and miss at best, so we’re glad we stocked up on high strength travel sickness pills when we were in the US earlier this year! But ultimately it’s all about having a break from the routine and finding out, once and for all, if cruises are something we enjoy. Given that I’ve always got awfully excited about simple ferry journeys, I think there will be enough to keep me entertained!

And if it’s all a disaster…well, at least then we’ll have some funny stories to tell on this blog when we get back.

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Summer in Portugal – why the Portuguese don’t sleep 4

Posted on August 12, 2013 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

Summer in Portugal is a wonderful time and particularly so in the Algarve. Entertainment offerings crank up during July until they reach fever pitch in August. For holidaymakers evenings can be spent enjoying relaxed meals sitting outside restaurants, followed by shopping, drinking or dancing for endless hours at a range of venues, local festivals and travelling markets. Days are for tanning by the pool or swimming in the sea of one of the Algarve’s many stunning beaches.

Summer in Portugal - hot sushi and sangria by the sea

Summer in Portugal – hot sushi and sangria by the sea

For those of use who live here, fitting in the countless summer activities around a fulltime work schedule and a calendar of visiting guests can be tricky – and very tiring! In the past couple of weeks we have spent the day at a waterpark, visited a casino, listened to an amazing sunset DJ set, swum in the sea, been out for dinner, danced the night away at the local nightclub and attended numerous BBQs. All while working 8-10 hour days.

With this many activities to pack into the schedule, something has to give. In our case, it’s been sleep that we’ve passed up on in order to fit everything else in. So it was a treat last night to get our first full night of deep sleep in about two weeks – despite the noise from a late night football game in our village.

This week, with a couple of beach visits, a night out with friends and attending the Olhão shellfish festival already on the cards even if nothing else comes up, I suspect we will be straight back to cutting out sleep in order to enjoy everything the summer has to offer.

Summer in Portugal - beautiful bars welcome you at sunset

Summer in Portugal – beautiful bars welcome you at sunset

It’s a routine that has taken us some years to adjust to and we debated yesterday why it is that the Portuguese don’t seem to sleep. Our conclusions, based purely on personal observations since we’ve lived here, are that our Portuguese friends are able seemingly to stay up all night every night during the summer months because:

1)      It’s too hot to sleep, even if you wanted to

2)      There’s so much to do that the frenetic energy of the Algarve continues to pulse through your veins when your own stock of energy runs out

3)      The Algarve is so quiet during the nine non-summer months of the year that everyone enters into a state of semi-hibernation to prepare for the following summer, when they do it all over again

Summer in Portugal - balancing work and play

Summer in Portugal – balancing work and play

After four years, we are beginning to adapt to the routine, with snatched cat-naps here and there giving us the energy for long days of work and even longer evenings and weekends of play. It might be tiring at times, but come October when we are sitting indoors and watching the rain pour down for days on end, we will be glad to know that we squeezed every last drop out of the Portuguese summer.

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Algarve – East v. West 14

Posted on July 29, 2013 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

As with any area of Portugal, the Algarve has its own particular flavours, sights and sounds, which combine to give it a wonderfully distinct regional makeup. Yet numerous differences exist within the Algarve region itself. If you are looking to move to the Algarve, or just come here for a holiday, this post should help you decide which area is right for you.

Algarve beaches - head west for stunning cliffs

Algarve beaches – head west for stunning cliffs

Beaches

The Algarve unquestionably has some stunning beaches. Those in the eastern Algarve (between Faro and the border with Spain) tend to be long, flat expanses of sand, which are perfect for lazy days soaking up the sun or lengthy beach walks. They include a number of delightful sand-spit beaches, which are accessed by crossing the tidal rivers and saltpans that make up the extensive Ria Formosa nature reserve. Crossings can be made by boat (for a small fee), by water taxi (for a slightly larger fee) or – in the case of Barril beach near Tavira – by a miniature train, which is particularly popular with small children.

The train at Barril - eastern quirks

The train at Barril – eastern quirks

West of Faro, the beaches tend to be backed by crumbling red and yellow cliffs, with tiny coves and eye-catching rock formations dotted about in the sea. They are arguably more scenic and are perfect for cliff-top rambles. On the Algarve’s western coast, from Cape St Vincent northward, the winds and giant Atlantic waves make for some great surfing spots.

For those who like to bathe in the sea, it’s worth noting that the sea water is significantly colder west of Faro than east. The warmest water in the Algarve is said to be in Monte Gordo, close to the Spanish border.

Stay east for a cheaper life

Stay east for a cheaper life

Cost

There is a notable price variation as you travel along the Algarve coast. The eastern Algarve is (very roughly) 20-30% cheaper than the central and western coast, for everything from accommodation to a glass of beer. We notice this price change every time we venture west and, though it doesn’t make much difference for the occasional day out, it soon adds up when we spend anything more than a day or two away from our eastern Algarve home.

Cuisine

The heavily seafood-influenced diet of the Algarve is available across the entire region, with specialities such as cataplana and arroz de marisco found in restaurants from one coast to the other. However, non-Portuguese food is far more readily available towards the west than it is in the east. We can get Chinese and Indian takeaways in our local area, but for decent Thai food or proper English fish and chips we have to head westward in order to be sure of both availability and quality.

Algarve cuisine - seafood is available from coast to coast

Algarve cuisine – seafood is available from coast to coast

Authenticity

The eastern Algarve is more authentically Portuguese than the central and west. Although we still get our fair share of tourists in the east, there is something more traditional about life here. It’s hard to define precisely how this is evidenced, as it’s really a range of small factors which combine to provide a more genuine experience of Portugal.

As an example – if you order food and drink in Portuguese in the eastern Algarve, the waiter will reply to you in Portuguese. Head west and the waiter will reply in English, no matter how good your attempt at speaking Portuguese might have been. In the central and western Algarve, particularly in places such as Vilamoura, the majority of restaurant boards will list their specialities in English first and Portuguese last (if at all). In the east, it’s the other way around.

Although these are subtle variations, the combined effect is that the eastern Algarve provides an experience of Portugal that just somehow feels much more genuinely Portuguese.

Eastern Algarve - more Portuguese

Eastern Algarve – more Portuguese

Weather

While the Algarve enjoys an alleged 300 days of sunshine per year, there are notable temperature differences as you travel along the coast. The sea is at its warmest off the far eastern coast by the town of Monte Gordo, where a sheltered bay means that the water is always more tempting than elsewhere. Lagos, towards the western end of the Algarve, tends to be windier and cooler than many of the other coastal towns. On the western coast, the winds sweeping off the Atlantic mean lower temperatures and beaches more suited to surfers than sunbathers.

Generally, we find that as we drive westward along the Algarve coast, we lose around 2-3 degrees of temperature the further we travel. Of course there will be times when it’s the other way round, but this is our general finding based on the years we’ve lived here.

East Algarve - there's no place like home

East Algarve – there’s no place like home

So these are some of the reasons we ended up living in the eastern Algarve. We enjoy visiting the west and Praia da Rocha, as the first place we ever stayed in Portugal, will always be close to our hearts, but at the end of a long day out we’re always happy to be heading home to the east.

Let us know which part of the Algarve you prefer by leaving a comment in the box below.

 

Image credits: Flickr, Wikimedia Commons

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Expats in Portugal: 5 Tips for Summer 6

Posted on July 22, 2013 by Ben Algarve
Meravista

Expats in Portugal tend to have a love/hate relationship with the summer. While we look forward to the arrival of sunshine, atmosphere and things to do, we usually start to complain by mid-July when the roads get busy, restaurant service becomes shambolic, and timing a trip the supermarket badly can mean queuing like it’s Christmas Eve!

Crowded Praia da Dona Ana - Lagos

Crowded Praia da Dona Ana – Lagos

So, in honour of the fact that we’ve now arrived at the time when we all begin to complain, here are five lighthearted tips to help residents in the Algarve cope with the summer.

 

1.      Time trips to the supermarket carefully

The worst possible time to arrive at the supermarket is when everyone’s on their way home from the beach. Sunday afternoons can be pretty hateful too.

All you have to do is think outside the box. Go early, when the tourists are sleeping off their hangovers, for minimal queues and maximum choice. Late doesn’t work quite so well, as although there may not be many people there, there’s probably not much stock either. Right in the middle of a hot day can work too – if, of course, you don’t have to work!

Sunshine - it's here all summer

Sunshine – it’s here all summer

2.      Get out of the expat mindset

It’s hard to get used to the fact that the sun is guaranteed to shine every day in the summer, and break out of the expat mentality that makes you feel compelled to get outside so as not to “waste the weather.”

Four years on, we’re still struggling to break our conditioning, but we’re getting there. We just have to get our work done and trust that the sun will still be there tomorrow.

 

3.      Go off the beaten track

There’s no getting around the fact that you may resent the thousands of people on “your” usually-near-deserted beach, but the tourists are the lifeblood of the Algarve economy.

Solitude - it's there if you know where to look!

Solitude – it’s there if you know where to look!

Instead, you must learn to go to places that the tourists haven’t discovered. We know a river beach that is never thronged, and also plenty of busy beaches where solitude can still be found after a 15 minute walk.

Best of all though, get to know some people with a house in the hills and ideally a pool. Then, spend your weekends there and save the beach for mid-September. We’re very lucky to have relatives in the country!

 

4.      Put water under the air conditioning

We always thought that putting a bowl of water in an air-conditioned room was an old wives’ tale. It’s not. If you spend a lot of time with the air conditioning on, the extra humidity from the water will prevent the worst of the peeling lips and sore throats.

Summer festivities

Summer festivities

5.      Remember you’re not on holiday

If you’ve retired then go ahead and enjoy yourself. If, like us, you still have a hefty Monday to Friday workload, you’ve still got to get it all done, and doing it with sunburn, heatstroke or a hangover is no fun at all.

 

So, sad though it is to accept, you must get your head down and get it done – and what better incentive is there to hammer through it than a beach at the end of the road – even if it is really bloody crowded!

 

Image credits: Wikimedia Commons

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      There are plenty of great things about living in Portugal, but we particularly love the ability to enjoy everything the Algarve has to offer in the off-season period.  There’s nowhere… Read More »
    • Only in Portugal!

      Only in Portugal!

      Boring techie stuff ahead – be warned! As I mentioned last week, we’ve just finished moving into our new home in Portugal—or at least we thought we had. It turns… Read More »
    • Living in Portugal: Our New Home

      Living in Portugal: Our New Home

      (Ben) Just as we approach our five-year anniversary of living in Portugal, we have finally completed the move to our new home. This weekend was hard work, and not helped… Read More »
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